Chemical Oceanography Research Cruises

AUGUST 2016, JANUARY 2013, & OCTOBER 2012

STUDYING CARBON IN THE OPEN OCEAN

ABOARD THE RV OCEANUS, RV POINT SUR, & RV NEW HORIZON

Advisor: Jim Bishop (PhD), UC Berkeley

   Under the supervision of Jim Bishop, Professor of Marine Geochemistry at UC Berkeley, I was able to attend three research cruises where I:

  • deployed carbon-profiling robots, CTD sensors, plankton nets, sediment PIT traps, McClane pumps, and adjusted sensors to resist pressure changes

  • filtered ocean water samples for Particulate Inorganic Carbon particles

  • filmed and analyzed the diurnal vertical migration of zooplankton

  • served as photographer & videographer for the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's blog oceanbots.lbl.gov

We deployed automated carbon-profiling robots. These robots, called Carbon Flux Explorers, float off on their own and measure the amount of carbon sedimentation occurring over the course of multiple days. We were qualifying the data collected using this method by comparing it to other data, collected through more conventional, surface-tethered methods. 

 

Phoebe Lam, a professor at UCSC, was deploying McClane pumps at various depths to compare to the data collected by Jim Bishop’s robots. Another scientist, FSU's Mike Stukel, was conducting biological surveys using plankton nets and measuring sedimentation using Particle Interceptor Traps (PIT traps). See below for a video from the cruise.

RELATED OUTREACH VIDEOS

Summing up the cruise

Presenting at the Exploratorium

PRESS COVERAGE OF THE CRUISE:

“EPS Undergraduate Student Jessica Kendall-Bar and Her Third Expedition at Sea Highlighted in UC Berkeley News” by the EPS Department at UC Berkeley

“Earth & Planetary Science Department undergraduate senior student Jessica Kendall-Bar is taking part in her third expedition at sea aboard the RV Oceanus. Kendall-Bar is majoring in marine science in the EPS Department, which gives her the opportunity to work at sea with Professor James Bishop on how carbon dioxide is sequestered in the oceans.

 

Kendall-Bar is a UC Regents scholar at Berkeley planning to graduate December 2016. Kendall-Bar is writing her honors thesis, after utiliizing the Charles H. Ramsden Endowed Fund to travel to Russia and conduct electrophysiological sleep recordings in two fur seals at the Utrish Marine Mammal Station.”

“A Floating Classroom for Students” by UC Berkeley News

“The voyage of the Oceanus is senior Jessica Kendall-Bar’s third expedition at sea, which makes her a old hand among the group of students who are plying the California coast for 10 days in the name of research.

Kendall-Bar is majoring in marine science and integrative biology, and the Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists aboard the Oceanus are perfecting seaworthy robots that can send back valuable information about carbon in the ocean and climate change."

“A Floating Classroom for Students” on the Oceanbots Berkeley Lab Website

“Kendall-Bar has taken on the role of teaching the greenhorns on the boat how to tie knots, launch CTDs, and filter water samples, among other skills and tasks.

‘This experience is a great way to get back into the research that we’ll be teaching the students of the Oceans course this semester,’ said Kendall-Bar, who will take on the role of a graduate student instructor in the undergraduate class taught by Bishop. Oceans attracts a diverse undergraduate population, including science and non-science majors.”

Jessie KB

ART & PHOTOGRAPHY

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